Dialects of the Yiddish language
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Dialects of the Yiddish language papers from the Second Annual Oxford Winter Symposium in Yiddish Language and Literature, 14-16 December 1986 by Oxford Winter Symposium in Yiddish Language and Literature (2nd 1986)

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Published by Pergamon Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Yiddish language -- Dialectology -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesLanguage and communication. Supplement.
Statementeditor, Dovid Katz.
SeriesWinter studies in Yiddish ;, v. 2
ContributionsKatz, Dovid.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPJ5111 .O94 1986
The Physical Object
Pagination123 p. :
Number of Pages123
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2033925M
ISBN 100080365647
LC Control Number88009897

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  Following an introduction to the definition and classification of Yiddish and its dialects, chapters in the book investigate the German, Hebrew, Romance, and Slavic components of Yiddish, as well as the sound changes that have occurred in the various dialects. The book will be of interest to all those working in the areas of Yiddish and Jewish Studies in particular, and historical linguistics Author: Alexander Beider.   Dialects of the Yiddish Language: Winter Studies in Yiddish: Editor: D. Katz: Edition: revised: Publisher: Elsevier, ISBN: , Length: pages: Subjects. Likewise, publication of Uriel Weinreich's Outlines of a Descriptive Yiddish Dialectology. Provisional Structural and Lexical Index to the Yiddish Language and Culture Atlas (U. Weinreich, b), a 'guidebook to the A t l a s ', is awaited with impatience.   Following an introduction to the definition and classification of Yiddish and its dialects, chapters in the book investigate the German, Hebrew, Romance, and Slavic components of Yiddish, as well as the sound changes that have occurred in the various dialects. The book will be of interest to all those working in the areas of Yiddish and Jewish Studies in particular, and historical linguistics and Cited by: 5.

EASTERN European Yiddish contains three main dialects of spoken Yiddish as it developed in 19 th century Eastern Europe: Northeastern (Lithuanian), Central (Polish), and Southeastern (Ukrainian): 1. "LITHUANIAN" or Northeastern Yiddish, spoken in Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, northeastern Ukraine, and northeastern Poland (Suwalki Gubernia). People speaking this dialect are called "Litvaks" and speak "Litvish. This book traces the origins of modern varieties of Yiddish and presents evidence for the claim that, contrary to most accounts, Yiddish only developed into a separate language in the 15th century. Through a careful analysis of Yiddish phonology, morphology, orthography, and the Yiddish lexicon in all its varieties, Alexander Beider shows how what are commonly referred to as Eastern Yiddish.   The book provides the description of topics he studied during his life: history and age of Yiddish, elements of Yiddish, “spontaneous development” (innovations internal to Yiddish), and dialects, script and sounds, morphology, and syntax (based on the Yiddish dialect of Poland). Jacobs, Neil G. Yiddish: A linguistic introduction.   This book traces the origins of modern varieties of Yiddish and presents evidence for the claim that, contrary to most accounts, Yiddish only developed into a separate language .

Yiddish. $ Learn a Yiddish accent of English from renowned dialect coach Paul Meier. This user-friendly book, or ebook, is the industry standard for this accent, spoken by . BIBLIOGRAPHY: The main works up to are inventoried in Uriel and Beatrice Weinreich, Yiddish Language and Folklore: a Selective Bibliography for Research, ().The most important current literature is covered in the annual bibliography issue of the Publications of the Modern Language Association (of America). Significant recent collections of studies are For Max Weinreich on His 70 th.   Listening to the various types of Yiddish spoken in the United States, one becomes aware of the m a n y phonetic, lexical and grammatical differences which exist a m o n g the dialects. Accordingly, Yiddish dialects were studied from two points of view, phonetic and lexical, by eliciting from the informants the names of a select group of objects. Pergamon Press in cooperation with the Oxford Centre for Postgraduate Hebrew Studies. DIALECTS OF THE YIDDISH LANGUAGE Winter Studies in Yiddish Volume 2 Papers from the Second Annual Oxford Winter Symposium in Yiddish Language and Literature, 14—16 December Editor: Dovid Katz Wolf Corob Fellow in Yiddish Language and Literature at the Oxford Centre for Postgraduate Hebrew Studies and Leslie Paisner Fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford Published in cooperation with the Oxford Centre.